IN THE NEWS: AFGHANISTAN STILL A VICTIM 16 YEARS AFTER 9/11 (SEPTEMBER 11, 2017)

Written by admin on Monday, September 11th, 2017

Selected by Olivier Immig & Jan van Heugten

Afghanistan Still A Victim 16 Years After 9/11
SOURCE: TOLO News
Monday, September 11, 2017
By SAYED SHARIF AMIRI

CEO Abdullah Abdullah on Monday said Afghanistan, as a front-line state in combating terrorism, has suffered more than any other nation in the world from the scourge.

The CEO made the remarks during a special gathering in Kabul on Monday marking the 16th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks in the United States – attacks carried out by the al-Qaeda terror network.

Abdullah said the 9/11 incident was a major event in the history of the world and that the people of Afghanistan continue to suffer from the menace of terrorism and extremism.

Meanwhile a number of Afghan citizens have said they still face enormous challenges despite 16 years of military involvement by the United States in post-Taliban Afghanistan.

On September 11, 2001, 19 militants associated with al-Qaeda hijacked four airplanes and carried out suicide attacks against targets in the United States.

Two of the planes were flown into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, a third plane hit the Pentagon just outside Washington, D.C., and the fourth plane crashed in a field in Pennsylvania.

Almost 3,000 people were killed during the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which triggered major US initiatives to combat terrorism.

In retaliation, then US president George W. Bush ordered a military attack against the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.

Although the US-led western invasion of Afghanistan toppled the Taliban regime, the Taliban reemerged as a potent militant group within a span of a few years and continued their military struggle against the US forces and the Kabul government.

“The 9th and 11th of September were major events over the past two decades which attracted the attention of the world towards the peril of terrorism and Afghanistan has been the first victim of terrorism,” said Abdullah.

Although the collapse of the Taliban regime raised new hopes among Afghans for lasting peace and security in the volatile country, that dream for peace has still not been realized. Instead, dozens of insurgent groups, including the Taliban and Daesh, are operating in the country and continue to wage war against the Afghan government.

According to some statistics, currently up to 20 terrorist groups are operating in different parts of the country and these groups have been active in destabilizing the security of Afghanistan.

“The United States did not achieve major breakthroughs in the security sector as hoped, because the terrorist groups such as Taliban and Daesh are growing except al-Qaeda,” said political analyst Faramarz Tamanna.

“Unfortunately our security has deteriorated, our economy is getting worse day by day, unemployment has increased and every day the blood of Afghans is shed,” said MP Ramazan Bashardost.

Billions of dollars in financial aid started pouring into Afghanistan following the collapse of the Taliban regime in 2001. Major reconstruction work was also undertaken to rebuild the war-torn country.

However, some of this money never reached the people who most needed it.

Gul Agha is a resident of Alishing district of Laghman. He fled Alishing three years ago along with his 18-member family to escape war and violence. His children have been deprived of an education due to poverty and unemployment.

“Our living condition is getting worse each day, we live in miserable conditions, money is being embezzled by the commanders and lawmakers,” said Gul Aghan.

After the establishment of a democratic government in Afghanistan in 2002, the international community generously supported Afghanistan in all sectors. Rough statistics show that more than $100 billion USD poured into the country since 2002, but 36 percent of Afghans are still living below the poverty line.

Large scale corruption, lack of foreign investment, security threats and lack of access to social services and training are among the key factors behind the poverty in Afghanistan, critics say.

 

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